Mourinho calls it a day at Chelsea for Poker online

 

 

Around an hour after midnight in England on Thursday, the news was broken that Jose Mourinho had left Chelsea after three years at the helm.

 

The Portuguese coach, who won two Premier League titles, an FA Cup and League Cup at Stamford Bridge, but failed to get beyond the Champions League semi-final, quit the club “by mutual consent” following the Blues’ disappointing 1-1 home draw with Rosenborg in the UEFA Champions League on Tuesday night.

 

Relations between Mourinho and billionaire club owner Roman Abramovich had been tense for some time, and following the $60million signing of Andriy Shevchenko last season, allegedly arranged by Abramovich above Mourinho’s head, rumors were fuelled that the former Porto and Benfica coach was on his way.

 

Mourinho in England was as opinionated and forthright as he had been in Portugal, but always stopped short of slamming his employer, despite everyone knowing he considered Abramovich his nemesis.

 

Their final parting, following a meeting to discuss Chelsea’s lame tie with the Norwegian minnows, therefore comes as no surprise, but is still a shock given that arguably the best coach in England has bagged the annual sack race for 2007/08.

 

Mourinho will surface again at a big or ambitious club before long, as talent of his calibre is too good to sink without trace. But the big issue emanating from today’s news, in a week when another anonymous Russian billionaire muscled his way into English football, is how the new breed of English club directors are seeking to impose their impossible dreams on the clubs they have splurged their wealth onto.

 

Managers and directors/owners have rarely seen eye to eye, but in this day and age the distance has widened intensely. When a coach as good as Mourinho is dispensed with, the fingers point inexorably towards a boardroom bust-up between one man oozing with football experience and another loaded with currency but with his head in the clouds when it come to the nitty-gritty of the sport.

 

A leader who wins five trophies in three years in Poker Online, including two domestic titles, half a century after the club’s previous league triumph, and receives the acclaim of the football world for his achievements, is surely someone worth keeping.

 

But that is not taking into account a flush Russian with a passion for global fame and success but with questionable sense about the sport he has bought into, a game in which sustained perfection is as good as impossible for any team to achieve.

 

David Shin: Young Korean Woking And Winging His Way To Success

 

Alan Shearer spent over a decade at the top of the English Premier League goalscoring charts famously fuelled by a diet of chicken and baked beans. David Shin is just starting out much further down the league ladder but the 18 year-old shares something in common with the ex-England captain and the average UK citizen, who, according to the BBC eat more than 15 pounds of beans each year. “I like beans so much,” laughed Shin down the ‘phone.

 

If the tinned food helps the Seoul-born Shin have half the success that Shearer had, he, and his family, based in London’s ‘Koreatown’ of New Malden will be delighted.

 

Inevitably known as ‘Shinny’ by his Woking FC team-mates, the player is starting to show his homeland that English football isn’t just about Manchester United, Arsenal, Chelsea and Liverpool. The lower leagues in England contain dozens of historic football clubs and the teenager is currently playing for Woking FC in what is commonly known as ‘The Conference’ –England’s ‘fifth division’.

 

August 27 saw the winger, who arrived in England five years ago and spent two years as a trainee with Fulham before joining Woking’s youth academy, make his first-team debut. Coming on as a second-half substitute with his team 2-0 down at Salisbury, Shin couldn’t help his team save the game but at least contributed to a more respectable 2-1 scoreline.

 

“I was so pleased that I came on second half which was my debut,” Shin said. “I helped the team to win in the second half but we lost 2-1 overall. I actually believed that i could change the game and I think I helped to do so but of course, I could have played better.”

 

Woking may be down in the nether regions of the English league pyramid but over 2,000 spectators witnessed the club’s new star make his debut in the historic cathedral city.

 

“The atmosphere was great,” said Shin. “Salisbury’s fans were great and there were a few of our fans there who cheered when I came on. At half time, the coach said to me: ‘You are playing on the left side, do your best’, that was it really.”

 

As one of the finest full-backs in English football in the seventies, Woking coach Frank Gray knows a thing or two about what makes a good winger and the former Leeds United star, who played in the 1975 European Cup final, likes the look of his Korean prospect.

 

“He has good ability, likes to take people on and likes to get forward,” Gray told me in a telephone interview and added, “Technically he is very good. He has excellent energy and fitness levels. We are very happy with him and he has a good future if he keeps working hard.”

 

“We are not looking for promotion at the moment, this is a transitional period for the club and we have lots of young players like David coming through so we need to be patient. We are looking to build something for the future but it will take a little time.”

 

Time is something that Shin has and just as importantly, he possesses a willingness to learn and a desire to improve. All are necessary if he is to climb the ladder to the Premier League pinnacle that is his stated target.

 

“I am looking to continue progressing and work harder and the chance to play at higher levels. My aim is to play in the Premiership and I have to work harder,” the teenager acknowledged.

 

Playing at the conference level is no picnic; there are thousands of talented young players who never reach that standard. But Shin wants to go further still and having already met his hero off the pitch, there is a chance that he could meet Lee Young-pyo on it.

 

“I met Lee Young-pyo twice and he talked to me and gave me advice,” said Shin of the Tottenham star. Despite the presence of Lee in London, Shin, like masses of his compatriots, supports a certain team from the north of England –Manchester United. Park Ji-sung often plays on the wings for the English champions but Shin believes he has more in common with one of Argentina’s finest players.

 

“People say I am similar to Lionel Messi,” he said. “I have quick feet and am fast. I use both feet.”

 

Keep both eyes open for David Shin.